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Peter Bräutigam

Company / Organization
Noerr LLP

Title / Position
Partner at Noerr LLP in Munich, Coordinating Partner in charge of Noerr’s Commercial division and a member of the IT, Outsourcing & Data Privacy Practice Group.

Short description
Prof. Dr Peter Bräutigam (TMT-IT Lawyer of the Year at the Who’s Who Legal Awards 2016) is a certified specialist in IT law, Partner at Noerr LLP in Munich, Coordinating Partner in charge of Noerr’s Commercial division and a member of the IT, Outsourcing & Data Privacy Practice Group. He advises clients on all aspects of IT law and digitalisation/Industry 4.0 He regularly issues publications and gives talks on current topics in digitalisation and IT law. He is member of the editorial board of Computer und Recht (CR) magazine, co-editor of the legal journal NJW and honorary professor at the University of Passau. In addition to his involvement in various associations (eg Deputy Chairman of the German Association of Law and Informatics, Vice Chair of the Cyber Crime Committee of the ITechLaw), Peter is on the management committee of the IT law taskforce of the German Lawyers Association as well as Chairman of the advisory board of the Data Protection Foundation.

Achievements: Co-editor of the study and legal opinion paper Digitalisation/Industry 4.0 published in conjunction with the industry association BDI as well as the legal handbooks IT-Outsourcing und Cloud-Computing (3rd edition) and E-Commerce (to be published in winter 2016).

Topic of speech
Digitalization, Blockchain and the Law:The Digitalization is changing the business world rapidly. Big Data, Cloud, Internet of Things, Blockchain are disruptive technologies which are threatening old business models. This change also has a huge impact on the law. That is particularly true for Data Protection, for the legal discussion on the ownership of data, for cloud contracts and IoT-platforms. Especially, the Blockchain technology providing a robust environment of data structure blocks is of utmost interest for enabling secure transactions (e.g. smart contracts, cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin). The session is focusing on the legal implication of these disruptive technologies under the law, in particular under EC-law, e.g. the new European General Data Protection Regulation, EU-US Privacy Shield and the recently published idea of an EU-wide “data producer’s right”.